What is an Audiologist?

An audiologist is a healthcare specialist who evaluates, diagnoses, treats, and manages hearing loss and balance disorders. Audiologists work with adults and children and are responsible for a number of different functions, including:

  • Prescribing, fitting, and dispensing hearing aids and other amplification devices to assist with hearing.
  • Design and implement programs to assist with hearing conservation and hearing screening.
  • Provide hearing rehabilitation training, including
    • Auditory training
    • Speech reading
    • Listening skills improvement
  • Evaluate and treat patients with tinnitus.
  • Treat individuals with central auditory processing disorders.

Audiologists may participate in hearing disorder research, help design hearing instruments and testing equipment, and manage clinics or private practices. They may work in hospitals, clinics, private practices, ENT offices, schools or universities, for the government or military, and in VA hospitals.

Most audiologists earn a doctor of audiology (AuD) degree from an accredited university with specialized training. Some earn a doctor of philosophy (PhD) or doctor of science (ScD) degree in hearing and balance sciences. They must be licensed or registered to practice in all states, and are required to pass a national exam.